Sunday, September 19, 2010

1975 Pontiac LeMans

The 1975 LeMans received mostly trim changes including new crosshatch grilles on base and Sport models, and a distinctive vertical bar grille with more chrome on the Grand LeMans (renamed from Luxury LeMans) series cars and only revised nameplates and tailight lenses in the rear. Interiors were revised on top Grand LeMans cars to include the distinctive wrap-around dashboard from the Grand Prix and Grand Am models with simulated African Crossfire Mahogany trim, a notchback bench seat with armrest in sedans and wagons or a no-cost choice of the notchback bench or Strato bucket seats in coupes.

Base LeMans and Sport Coupe models carried over trim only slightly revised from 1974 including a revised Custom Cushioned steering wheel. Big news for 1975, however, was Pontiac's Maximum Mileage System which consisted of GM's new catalytic converter which reduced emissions while improving drivability and fuel economy, a High Energy electronic ignition, and lengthened routine maintenance intervals. Radial tires were standard on all models and a "Radial Tuned Suspension" option was available that included upgraded radial tires along with front and rear sway bars.

Engines were revised for 1975 to meet that year's emission requirements and mated to the catalytic converter, which spelled the end of true dual exhausts. The 250 cubic-inch Chevy inline six was standard on base LeMans coupes and sedans while the 350 two-barrel V8 was optional and standard on the LeMans Sport Coupe, and Grand LeMans sedans and coupes, and optional engines on all of those models including a 350 four-barrel and a 400 two-barrel. LeMans and Grand LeMans Safari wagons came standard with a 400 four-barrel engine that was optional on other models.

The 455 V8 was discontinued for all LeMans models for 1975, but still available in the Grand Am. Transmission offerings included a three-speed manual standard with the six-cylinder and 350 two-barrel V8, with the three-speed Turbo Hydra-matic optional with those engines, a "mandatory" option with all other engines in sedans and coupes, and standard on the Safari wagons. The Hurst-shifted four-speed manual was no longer offered.

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